Research for flipped learning

Flipped learning in mathematics has recently attracted considerable interest around the world. Even though the manner in which each teacher actually flips the teaching and learning process of mathematics in his or her own classes varies, flipped learning does require the teacher to reassess his or her pedagogical habits and beliefs. Flipped learning raises the question of whether humanist perspectives, such as freedom, dignity, and potential of humans, should have a higher profile in teaching and students’ learning in mathematics. The main aim of this blog and articles published here is to elicit fresh understandings about the culture of flipped learning and to consider it as a pedagogical approach in mathematics via general theoretical point of view offered by the learning and motivation theories.

I warmly welcome you to follow my work, which is not only PhD for me but also my passion. The articles which are published until now: 











Feel free to contact me if you have any further questions: 
mrstoivola@gmail.com.

    4 comments:

    1. I find this very interesting. I currently work in the professional world of Learning and Development within a large corporation. I was not educated in learning pedagogy but rather business and HR while pursuing a Master's Degree. While there are some elements of flipped learning that are incorporated into our learning programs, I have seen this in greater depth while watching my children in their high school education. My oldest daughter took either calculus or precalculus from a teacher who obviously was trying to employ a "flipped classroom". She had prerecorded lectures which were given as assignments to watch outside of class and then class time was dedicated to working through problems. I believe collaboration was encouraged but I don't know to what extent and she certainly went and helped some (but believe that there struggles for her to individually help the large number of students). I think overall, this was a positive learning experience for my daughter as she could refer back to content, not to mention supplement with other online resources (Khan Academy and the like).

      My 2nd daughter now is taking precalculus from a traditional classroom teacher. Her experience has been awful. Homework is graded and the teacher does not seem to cover much of the subject matter. They are left to their own devices. While my daughter would certainly benefit from the collaboration with others, she struggles to initiate this outside of class.

      From that simple and unscientific observation, I see the value in the flipped method. I do have some reservations however as advanced mathematics becomes increasingly complex and at times difficult for individuals to grasp concepts on their own. I would be curious to read more about this and how this applies to higher level mathematics and in other settings.

      ReplyDelete
    2. Nice ideas Marika, I look forward to reading the linked article.

      I am currently working on my dissertation proposal and looking a K-12 classroom teachers who have flipped their classrooms as most research has been conducted at the university level while most "flippers" are public school teachers. I'm looking at what activities they are using in the classroom time that has been freed up by taking lecture out of the classroom. At first glance I think your flipped learning idea seems what Jon and Aaron are calling the "flipped mastery" model.

      As a side note, I am note a fan of Stayer's research (2012) as it is very easy to argue that he did not actually flip his class when conducting his research.

      Good luck with your research.

      Phil

      ReplyDelete